Physical and Chemical Properties – Chemistry (2022)

Essential Ideas

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Learning Objectives

By the end of this section, you will be able to:

  • Identify properties of and changes in matter as physical or chemical
  • Identify properties of matter as extensive or intensive

The characteristics that enable us to distinguish one substance from another are called properties. A physical property is a characteristic of matter that is not associated with a change in its chemical composition. Familiar examples of physical properties include density, color, hardness, melting and boiling points, and electrical conductivity. We can observe some physical properties, such as density and color, without changing the physical state of the matter observed. Other physical properties, such as the melting temperature of iron or the freezing temperature of water, can only be observed as matter undergoes a physical change. A physical change is a change in the state or properties of matter without any accompanying change in its chemical composition (the identities of the substances contained in the matter). We observe a physical change when wax melts, when sugar dissolves in coffee, and when steam condenses into liquid water ([link]). Other examples of physical changes include magnetizing and demagnetizing metals (as is done with common antitheft security tags) and grinding solids into powders (which can sometimes yield noticeable changes in color). In each of these examples, there is a change in the physical state, form, or properties of the substance, but no change in its chemical composition.

(a) Wax undergoes a physical change when solid wax is heated and forms liquid wax. (b) Steam condensing inside a cooking pot is a physical change, as water vapor is changed into liquid water. (credit a: modification of work by “95jb14”/Wikimedia Commons; credit b: modification of work by “mjneuby”/Flickr)

Physical and Chemical Properties – Chemistry (1)

The change of one type of matter into another type (or the inability to change) is a chemical property. Examples of chemical properties include flammability, toxicity, acidity, reactivity (many types), and heat of combustion. Iron, for example, combines with oxygen in the presence of water to form rust; chromium does not oxidize ([link]). Nitroglycerin is very dangerous because it explodes easily; neon poses almost no hazard because it is very unreactive.

(a) One of the chemical properties of iron is that it rusts; (b) one of the chemical properties of chromium is that it does not. (credit a: modification of work by Tony Hisgett; credit b: modification of work by “Atoma”/Wikimedia Commons)

Physical and Chemical Properties – Chemistry (2)

To identify a chemical property, we look for a chemical change. A chemical change always produces one or more types of matter that differ from the matter present before the change. The formation of rust is a chemical change because rust is a different kind of matter than the iron, oxygen, and water present before the rust formed. The explosion of nitroglycerin is a chemical change because the gases produced are very different kinds of matter from the original substance. Other examples of chemical changes include reactions that are performed in a lab (such as copper reacting with nitric acid), all forms of combustion (burning), and food being cooked, digested, or rotting ([link]).

(a) Copper and nitric acid undergo a chemical change to form copper nitrate and brown, gaseous nitrogen dioxide. (b) During the combustion of a match, cellulose in the match and oxygen from the air undergo a chemical change to form carbon dioxide and water vapor. (c) Cooking red meat causes a number of chemical changes, including the oxidation of iron in myoglobin that results in the familiar red-to-brown color change. (d) A banana turning brown is a chemical change as new, darker (and less tasty) substances form. (credit b: modification of work by Jeff Turner; credit c: modification of work by Gloria Cabada-Leman; credit d: modification of work by Roberto Verzo)

Physical and Chemical Properties – Chemistry (3)

(Video) Physical vs Chemical Properties

Properties of matter fall into one of two categories. If the property depends on the amount of matter present, it is an extensive property. The mass and volume of a substance are examples of extensive properties; for instance, a gallon of milk has a larger mass and volume than a cup of milk. The value of an extensive property is directly proportional to the amount of matter in question. If the property of a sample of matter does not depend on the amount of matter present, it is an intensive property. Temperature is an example of an intensive property. If the gallon and cup of milk are each at 20 °C (room temperature), when they are combined, the temperature remains at 20 °C. As another example, consider the distinct but related properties of heat and temperature. A drop of hot cooking oil spattered on your arm causes brief, minor discomfort, whereas a pot of hot oil yields severe burns. Both the drop and the pot of oil are at the same temperature (an intensive property), but the pot clearly contains much more heat (extensive property).

Hazard Diamond

You may have seen the symbol shown in [link] on containers of chemicals in a laboratory or workplace. Sometimes called a “fire diamond” or “hazard diamond,” this chemical hazard diamond provides valuable information that briefly summarizes the various dangers of which to be aware when working with a particular substance.

The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) hazard diamond summarizes the major hazards of a chemical substance.

Physical and Chemical Properties – Chemistry (4)

The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) 704 Hazard Identification System was developed by NFPA to provide safety information about certain substances. The system details flammability, reactivity, health, and other hazards. Within the overall diamond symbol, the top (red) diamond specifies the level of fire hazard (temperature range for flash point). The blue (left) diamond indicates the level of health hazard. The yellow (right) diamond describes reactivity hazards, such as how readily the substance will undergo detonation or a violent chemical change. The white (bottom) diamond points out special hazards, such as if it is an oxidizer (which allows the substance to burn in the absence of air/oxygen), undergoes an unusual or dangerous reaction with water, is corrosive, acidic, alkaline, a biological hazard, radioactive, and so on. Each hazard is rated on a scale from 0 to 4, with 0 being no hazard and 4 being extremely hazardous.

While many elements differ dramatically in their chemical and physical properties, some elements have similar properties. We can identify sets of elements that exhibit common behaviors. For example, many elements conduct heat and electricity well, whereas others are poor conductors. These properties can be used to sort the elements into three classes: metals (elements that conduct well), nonmetals (elements that conduct poorly), and metalloids (elements that have properties of both metals and nonmetals).

The periodic table is a table of elements that places elements with similar properties close together ([link]). You will learn more about the periodic table as you continue your study of chemistry.

The periodic table shows how elements may be grouped according to certain similar properties. Note the background color denotes whether an element is a metal, metalloid, or nonmetal, whereas the element symbol color indicates whether it is a solid, liquid, or gas.

Physical and Chemical Properties – Chemistry (5)

(Video) Physical vs Chemical Properties - Explained

All substances have distinct physical and chemical properties, and may undergo physical or chemical changes. Physical properties, such as hardness and boiling point, and physical changes, such as melting or freezing, do not involve a change in the composition of matter. Chemical properties, such flammability and acidity, and chemical changes, such as rusting, involve production of matter that differs from that present beforehand.

Measurable properties fall into one of two categories. Extensive properties depend on the amount of matter present, for example, the mass of gold. Intensive properties do not depend on the amount of matter present, for example, the density of gold. Heat is an example of an extensive property, and temperature is an example of an intensive property.

Classify the six underlined properties in the following paragraph as chemical or physical:

Fluorine is a pale yellow gas that reacts with most substances. The free element melts at −220 °C and boils at −188 °C. Finely divided metals burn in fluorine with a bright flame. Nineteen grams of fluorine will react with 1.0 gram of hydrogen.

Classify each of the following changes as physical or chemical:

(a) condensation of steam

(b) burning of gasoline

(c) souring of milk

(d) dissolving of sugar in water

(Video) Physical and Chemical Properties | Chemistry

(e) melting of gold

(a) physical; (b) chemical; (c) chemical; (d) physical; (e) physical

Classify each of the following changes as physical or chemical:

(a) coal burning

(b) ice melting

(c) mixing chocolate syrup with milk

(d) explosion of a firecracker

(e) magnetizing of a screwdriver

The volume of a sample of oxygen gas changed from 10 mL to 11 mL as the temperature changed. Is this a chemical or physical change?

physical

A 2.0-liter volume of hydrogen gas combined with 1.0 liter of oxygen gas to produce 2.0 liters of water vapor. Does oxygen undergo a chemical or physical change?

(Video) PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF MATTER | Animation

Explain the difference between extensive properties and intensive properties.

The value of an extensive property depends upon the amount of matter being considered, whereas the value of an intensive property is the same regardless of the amount of matter being considered.

Identify the following properties as either extensive or intensive.

(a) volume

(b) temperature

(c) humidity

(d) heat

(e) boiling point

The density (d) of a substance is an intensive property that is defined as the ratio of its mass (m) to its volume (V).

\(\text{density}=\phantom{\rule{0.2em}{0ex}}\frac{\text{mass}}{\text{volume}}\phantom{\rule{2em}{0ex}}\text{d}=\phantom{\rule{0.2em}{0ex}}\frac{\text{m}}{\text{V}}\)

(Video) Physical and Chemical Changes: Chemistry for Kids - FreeSchool

Considering that mass and volume are both extensive properties, explain why their ratio, density, is intensive.

Being extensive properties, both mass and volume are directly proportional to the amount of substance under study. Dividing one extensive property by another will in effect “cancel” this dependence on amount, yielding a ratio that is independent of amount (an intensive property).

Glossary

chemical change
change producing a different kind of matter from the original kind of matter
chemical property
behavior that is related to the change of one kind of matter into another kind of matter
extensive property
property of a substance that depends on the amount of the substance
intensive property
property of a substance that is independent of the amount of the substance
physical change
change in the state or properties of matter that does not involve a change in its chemical composition
physical property
characteristic of matter that is not associated with any change in its chemical composition

FAQs

What are the physical properties in chemistry? ›

A physical property is a characteristic of matter that is not associated with a change in its chemical composition. Familiar examples of physical properties include density, color, hardness, melting and boiling points, and electrical conductivity.

What are 4 chemical properties? ›

Examples of chemical properties include flammability, toxicity, acidity, reactivity (many types), and heat of combustion.

What is the difference between physical and chemical? ›

In a physical change the nature of the substance, the particles of which it is composed and the numbers of particles remain unchanged. In a chemical change the properties of the new substances are different from the original, the particles are different and the number of particles can change.

What are 5 chemical properties examples? ›

Examples of chemical properties include flammability, toxicity, acidity, reactivity (many types), and heat of combustion. Iron, for example, combines with oxygen in the presence of water to form rust; chromium does not oxidize ([link]).

What is a chemical property simple definition? ›

A chemical property is a characteristic of a particular substance that can be observed in a chemical reaction. Some major chemical properties include flammability, toxicity, heat of combustion, pH value, rate of radioactive decay, and chemical stability.

What are the 3 physical properties? ›

A physical property is a characteristic of a substance that can be observed or measured without changing the identity of the substance. Physical properties include color, density, hardness, and melting and boiling points. A chemical property describes the ability of a substance to undergo a specific chemical change.

What are some examples of physical and chemical properties? ›

The general properties of matter such as color, density, hardness, are examples of physical properties. Properties that describe how a substance changes into a completely different substance are called chemical properties. Flammability and corrosion/oxidation resistance are examples of chemical properties.

How many chemical properties are there? ›

What are 10 chemical properties examples? 10 examples of chemical properties include flammability, toxicity, solubility, heat from combustion, radioactivity, types of chemical bonds formed, coordination number, oxidization states, and acidity or basicity.

What are example of chemical properties? ›

Examples of chemical properties include flammability, toxicity, acidity, reactivity (many types), and heat of combustion. Iron, for example, combines with oxygen in the presence of water to form rust; chromium does not oxidize (Figure 3).

What are 3 differences between physical and chemical? ›

Examples of chemical changes are burning, cooking, rusting, and rotting. Examples of physical changes are boiling, melting, freezing, and shredding. Many physical changes are reversible if sufficient energy is supplied. The only way to reverse a chemical change is via another chemical reaction.

What are 2 differences between physical and chemical changes? ›

A chemical change is a permanent change. A Physical change affects only physical properties i.e. shape, size, etc. A physical change involves very little to no absorption of energy. During a chemical reaction, absorption and evolution of energy take place.

What is meant by physical properties? ›

Definition of physical property

: a property (as color, hardness, boiling point) of matter not involving in its manifestation a chemical change.

How do you identify chemical properties? ›

The chemical properties of a substance can be determined by performing experiments that use specific materials or processes with known characteristics. If a material affects the substance in a given way, the substance has a particular property. If a process changes the substance, more properties can be deduced.

What are 3 physical changes examples? ›

A physical change is a change in appearance only. The matter is still the same after the change takes place. Examples of physical change include, cutting paper, melting butter, dissolving salt in water, and breaking glass.

What is the main difference between physical properties and chemical properties quizlet? ›

What is the difference between chemical properties and physical properties? chemical properties are characteristics that describe a substance's ability to change into different substances, and physical properties are characteristics that can be observed without changing it into another substance.

What is chemical properties of metals? ›

Difference Between Chemical Properties of Metal and Nonmetals
MetalsNon-metals
They have 1, 2 or 3 electrons in the valence shell. So they can lose electrons easily.Nonmetals own more than 4 electrons in their valence shell. So they can easily gain electrons.
Metals produce the basic oxidesThey form acid oxides
3 more rows

Is color a physical property? ›

Characteristics such as melting point, boiling point, density, solubility, color, odor, etc. are physical properties. Properties that describe how a substance changes identity to produce a new substance are chemical properties.

What is the 10 physical properties? ›

Physical properties include: appearance, texture, color, odor, melting point, boiling point, density, solubility, polarity, and many others.

What is the difference between physical property and chemical properties? ›

Chemical properties are properties that can be observed or measured when a substance undergoes a chemical change. Physical properties are properties that can be observed without bringing a chemical change. A chemical reaction needs to be conducted to show the property.

What are some 5 examples of physical properties? ›

What Are 5 Examples Of Physical Properties?
  • Density.
  • Melting point.
  • Boiling point.
  • Hardness.
  • Electrical conductivity.

How do you identify physical properties? ›

Physical properties examples - YouTube

What are four physical properties? ›

A physical property is a characteristic of a substance that can be observed or measured without changing the identity of the substance. Physical properties include color, density, hardness, and melting and boiling points.

Is PH a physical property? ›

Examples of chemical properties are: heat of combustion, reactivity with water, PH, and electromotive force. The more properties we can identify for a substance, the better we know the nature of that substance.

Is smell physical or chemical? ›

Since we smell things without causing any change to the molecular structure of the substance, odor is classified as a physical property. Note that chemical reactions take place in our body so that the receptor can communicate with our brain, but there is no chemical reaction to the molecule of the substance itself.

What are the 10 physical chemical properties? ›

Physical properties of matter include color, hardness, malleability, solubility, electrical conductivity, density, melting point, and boiling point. For the elements, color does not vary much from one element to the next.

What are the 7 physical properties of organic compounds? ›

In general, organic compounds tend to possess covalent bonding. They form the building blocks for all living organisms. They are defined by diverse physical properties such as odor, solubility, density, melting point, and boiling point.

What are examples of physical properties and chemical properties? ›

The general properties of matter such as color, density, hardness, are examples of physical properties. Properties that describe how a substance changes into a completely different substance are called chemical properties. Flammability and corrosion/oxidation resistance are examples of chemical properties.

How many physical properties are there? ›

There are two types of physical properties: intensive properties and extensive properties.

What is an example of physical chemistry? ›

Physical chemistry is the branch of chemistry that deals with the physical structure of chemical compounds, the way they react with other matter and the bonds that hold their atoms together. An example of physical chemistry is nitric acid eating through wood.

What is meant by physical properties? ›

Definition of physical property

: a property (as color, hardness, boiling point) of matter not involving in its manifestation a chemical change.

What are 3 differences between physical and chemical changes? ›

In a physical change, no new substance is formed. A chemical change is always accompanied by one or more new substance(s). Physical change is easily reversible i.e original substance can be recovered. Chemical changes are irreversible i.e. original substance cannot be recovered.

What are the six physical properties of organic compounds? ›

Answer and Explanation: 1. Six physical properties chemists can observe about organic compounds are color, melting point, boiling point, solubility, physical state, or odor.

What are the chemical properties of organic compounds? ›

Organic compounds are compounds based on carbon. They contain carbon and hydrogen, and can also contain other nonmetal elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, or halogen atoms.

What compound is inorganic? ›

Inorganic substances are a group of chemicals that contain no carbon. Examples include ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, all metals, and most elements (such as calcium).

What is the main difference between physical properties and chemical properties quizlet? ›

What is the difference between chemical properties and physical properties? chemical properties are characteristics that describe a substance's ability to change into different substances, and physical properties are characteristics that can be observed without changing it into another substance.

How do you identify physical properties? ›

Physical properties examples - YouTube

Why physical properties are important? ›

Physical properties can be observed or measured without changing the composition of matter. Physical properties are used to observe and describe matter. Physical properties of materials and systems are often described as intensive and extensive properties.

What is the difference between physical property and chemical properties? ›

Chemical properties are properties that can be observed or measured when a substance undergoes a chemical change. Physical properties are properties that can be observed without bringing a chemical change. A chemical reaction needs to be conducted to show the property.

Is smell physical or chemical? ›

Since we smell things without causing any change to the molecular structure of the substance, odor is classified as a physical property. Note that chemical reactions take place in our body so that the receptor can communicate with our brain, but there is no chemical reaction to the molecule of the substance itself.

Videos

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