1910.307 - Hazardous (classified) locations. (2022)

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  2. 1910.307 - Hazardous (classified) locations.

1910.307(a)

Scope --

1910.307(a)(1)

Applicability. This section covers the requirements for electric equipment and wiring in locations that are classified depending on the properties of the flammable vapors, liquids or gases, or combustible dusts or fibers that may be present therein and the likelihood that a flammable or combustible concentration or quantity is present. Hazardous (classified) locations may be found in occupancies such as, but not limited to, the following: aircraft hangars, gasoline dispensing and service stations, bulk storage plants for gasoline or other volatile flammable liquids, paint-finishing process plants, health care facilities, agricultural or other facilities where excessive combustible dusts may be present, marinas, boat yards, and petroleum and chemical processing plants. Each room, section or area shall be considered individually in determining its classification.

1910.307(a)(2)

Classifications.

1910.307(a)(2)(i)

These hazardous (classified) locations are assigned the following designations:

1910.307(a)(2)(i)(A)

Class I, Division 1

1910.307(a)(2)(i)(B)

Class I, Division 2

1910.307(a)(2)(i)(C)

Class I, Zone 0

1910.307(a)(2)(i)(D)

Class I, Zone 1

1910.307(a)(2)(i)(E)

Class I, Zone 2

1910.307(a)(2)(i)(F)

Class II, Division 1

1910.307(a)(2)(i)(G)

Class II, Division 2

1910.307(a)(2)(i)(H)

Class III, Division 1

1910.307(a)(2)(i)(I)

Class III, Division 2

1910.307(a)(2)(ii)

For definitions of these locations, see § 1910.399.

1910.307(a)(3)

Other sections of this subpart. All applicable requirements in this subpart apply to hazardous (classified) locations unless modified by provisions of this section.

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1910.307(a)(4)

Division and zone classification. In Class I locations, an installation must be classified as using the division classification system meeting paragraphs (c), (d), (e), and (f) of this section or using the zone classification system meeting paragraph (g) of this section. In Class II and Class III locations, an installation must be classified using the division classification system meeting paragraphs (c), (d), (e), and (f) of this section.

1910.307(b)

Documentation. All areas designated as hazardous (classified) locations under the Class and Zone system and areas designated under the Class and Division system established after August 13, 2007 shall be properly documented. This documentation shall be available to those authorized to design, install, inspect, maintain, or operate electric equipment at the location.

1910.307(c)

Electrical installations. Equipment, wiring methods, and installations of equipment in hazardous (classified) locations shall be intrinsically safe, approved for the hazardous (classified) location, or safe for the hazardous (classified) location. Requirements for each of these options are as follows:

1910.307(c)(1)

Intrinsically safe. Equipment and associated wiring approved as intrinsically safe is permitted in any hazardous (classified) location for which it is approved;

1910.307(c)(2)

Approved for the hazardous (classified) location.

1910.307(c)(2)(i)

Equipment shall be approved not only for the class of location, but also for the ignitable or combustible properties of the specific gas, vapor, dust, or fiber that will be present.

Note to paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section: NFPA 70, the National Electrical Code, lists or defines hazardous gases, vapors, and dusts by "Groups" characterized by their ignitable or combustible properties.

1910.307(c)(2)(ii)

Equipment shall be marked to show the class, group, and operating temperature or temperature range, based on operation in a 40-degree C ambient, for which it is approved. The temperature marking may not exceed the ignition temperature of the specific gas or vapor to be encountered. However, the following provisions modify this marking requirement for specific equipment:

1910.307(c)(2)(ii)(A)

Equipment of the nonheat-producing type, such as junction boxes, conduit, and fittings, and equipment of the heat-producing type having a maximum temperature not more than 100º C (212º F) need not have a marked operating temperature or temperature range;

1910.307(c)(2)(ii)(B)

Fixed lighting fixtures marked for use in Class I, Division 2 or Class II, Division 2 locations only need not be marked to indicate the group;

1910.307(c)(2)(ii)(C)

Fixed general-purpose equipment in Class I locations, other than lighting fixtures, that is acceptable for use in Class I, Division 2 locations need not be marked with the class, group, division, or operating temperature;

1910.307(c)(2)(ii)(D)

Fixed dust-tight equipment, other than lighting fixtures, that is acceptable for use in Class II, Division 2 and Class III locations need not be marked with the class, group, division, or operating temperature; and

1910.307(c)(2)(ii)(E)

Electric equipment suitable for ambient temperatures exceeding 40º C (104º F) shall be marked with both the maximum ambient temperature and the operating temperature or temperature range at that ambient temperature; and

1910.307(c)(3)

Safe for the hazardous (classified) location. Equipment that is safe for the location shall be of a type and design that the employer demonstrates will provide protection from the hazards arising from the combustibility and flammability of vapors, liquids, gases, dusts, or fibers involved.

Note to paragraph (c)(3) of this section: The National Electrical Code, NFPA 70, contains guidelines for determining the type and design of equipment and installations that will meet this requirement. Those guidelines address electric wiring, equipment, and systems installed in hazardous (classified) locations and contain specific provisions for the following: wiring methods, wiring connections; conductor insulation, flexible cords, sealing and drainage, transformers, capacitors, switches, circuit breakers, fuses, motor controllers, receptacles, attachment plugs, meters, relays, instruments, resistors, generators, motors, lighting fixtures, storage battery charging equipment, electric cranes, electric hoists and similar equipment, utilization equipment, signaling systems, alarm systems, remote control systems, local loud speaker and communication systems, ventilation piping, live parts, lightning surge protection, and grounding.

1910.307(d)

Conduits. All conduits shall be threaded and shall be made wrench-tight. Where it is impractical to make a threaded joint tight, a bonding jumper shall be utilized.

1910.307(e)

Equipment in Division 2 locations. Equipment that has been approved for a Division 1 location may be installed in a Division 2 location of the same class and group. General-purpose equipment or equipment in general-purpose enclosures may be installed in Division 2 locations if the employer can demonstrate that the equipment does not constitute a source of ignition under normal operating conditions.

1910.307(f)

Protection techniques. The following are acceptable protection techniques for electric and electronic equipment in hazardous (classified) locations.

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1910.307(f)(1)

Explosionproof apparatus. This protection technique is permitted for equipment in the Class I, Division 1 and 2 locations for which it is approved.

1910.307(f)(2)

Dust ignitionproof. This protection technique is permitted for equipment in the Class II, Division 1 and 2 locations for which it is approved.

1910.307(f)(3)

Dust-tight. This protection technique is permitted for equipment in the Class II, Division 2 and Class III locations for which it is approved.

1910.307(f)(4)

Purged and pressurized. This protection technique is permitted for equipment in any hazardous (classified) location for which it is approved.

1910.307(f)(5)

Nonincendive circuit. This protection technique is permitted for equipment in Class I, Division 2; Class II, Division 2; or Class III, Division 1or 2 locations.

1910.307(f)(6)

Nonincendive equipment. This protection technique is permitted for equipment in Class I, Division 2; Class II, Division 2; or Class III, Division 1 or 2 locations.

1910.307(f)(7)

Nonincendive component. This protection technique is permitted for equipment in Class I, Division 2; Class II, Division 2; or Class III, Division 1 or 2 locations.

1910.307(f)(8)

Oil immersion. This protection technique is permitted for current-interrupting contacts in Class I, Division 2 locations as described in the Subpart.

1910.307(f)(9)

Hermetically sealed. This protection technique is permitted for equipment in Class I, Division 2; Class II, Division 2; and Class III, Division 1 or 2 locations.

1910.307(f)(10)

Other protection techniques. Any other protection technique that meets paragraph (c) of this section is acceptable in any hazardous (classified) location.

1910.307(g)

Class I, Zone 0, 1, and 2 locations --

1910.307(g)(1)

Scope. Employers may use the zone classification system as an alternative to the division classification system for electric and electronic equipment and wiring for all voltage in Class I, Zone 0, Zone 1, and Zone 2 hazardous (classified) locations where fire or explosion hazards may exist due to flammable gases, vapors, or liquids.

1910.307(g)(2)

Location and general requirements.

1910.307(g)(2)(i)

Locations shall be classified depending on the properties of the flammable vapors, liquids, or gases that may be present and the likelihood that a flammable or combustible concentration or quantity is present. Where pyrophoric materials are the only materials used or handled, these locations need not be classified.

1910.307(g)(2)(ii)

Each room, section, or area shall be considered individually in determining its classification.

1910.307(g)(2)(iii)

All threaded conduit shall be threaded with an NPT (National (American) Standard Pipe Taper) standard conduit cutting die that provides 3/4-in. taper per foot. The conduit shall be made wrench tight to prevent sparking when fault current flows through the conduit system and to ensure the explosionproof or flameproof integrity of the conduit system where applicable.

1910.307(g)(2)(iv)

Equipment provided with threaded entries for field wiring connection shall be installed in accordance with paragraph (g)(2)(iv)(A) or (g)(2)(iv)(B) of this section.

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1910.307(g)(2)(iv)(A)

For equipment provided with threaded entries for NPT threaded conduit or fittings, listed conduit, conduit fittings, or cable fittings shall be used.

1910.307(g)(2)(iv)(B)

For equipment with metric threaded entries, such entries shall be identified as being metric, or listed adaptors to permit connection to conduit of NPT-threaded fittings shall be provided with the equipment. Adapters shall be used for connection to conduit or NPT-threaded fittings.

1910.307(g)(3)

Protection techniques. One or more of the following protection techniques shall be used for electric and electronic equipment in hazardous (classified) locations classified under the zone classification system.

1910.307(g)(3)(i)

Flameproof "d" -- This protection technique is permitted for equipment in the Class I, Zone 1 locations for which it is approved.

1910.307(g)(3)(ii)

Purged and pressurized -- This protection technique is permitted for equipment in the Class I, Zone 1 or Zone 2 locations for which it is approved.

1910.307(g)(3)(iii)

Intrinsic safety -- This protection technique is permitted for equipment in the Class I, Zone 0 or Zone 1 locations for which it is approved.

1910.307(g)(3)(iv)

Type of protection "n" -- This protection technique is permitted for equipment in the Class I, Zone 2 locations for which it is approved. Type of protection "n" is further subdivided into nA, nC, and nR.

1910.307(g)(3)(v)

Oil Immersion "o" -- This protection technique is permitted for equipment in the Class I, Zone 1 locations for which it is approved.

1910.307(g)(3)(vi)

Increased safety "e" -- This protection technique is permitted for equipment in the Class I, Zone 1 locations for which it is approved.

1910.307(g)(3)(vii)

Encapsulation "m" -- This protection technique is permitted for equipment in the Class I, Zone 1 locations for which it is approved.

1910.307(g)(3)(viii)

Powder Filling "q" -- This protection technique is permitted for equipment in the Class I, Zone 1 locations for which it is approved.

1910.307(g)(4)

Special precaution. Paragraph (g) of this section requires equipment construction and installation that will ensure safe performance under conditions of proper use and maintenance.

1910.307(g)(4)(i)

Classification of areas and selection of equipment and wiring methods shall be under the supervision of a qualified registered professional engineer.

1910.307(g)(4)(ii)

In instances of areas within the same facility classified separately, Class I, Zone 2 locations may abut, but not overlap, Class I, Division 2 locations. Class I, Zone 0 or Zone 1 locations may not abut Class I, Division 1 or Division 2 locations.

1910.307(g)(4)(iii)

A Class I, Division 1 or Division 2 location may be reclassified as a Class I, Zone 0, Zone 1, or Zone 2 location only if all of the space that is classified because of a single flammable gas or vapor source is reclassified.

Note to paragraph (g)(4) of this section: Low ambient conditions require special consideration. Electric equipment depending on the protection techniques described by paragraph (g)(3)(i) of this section may not be suitable for use at temperatures lower than -20 ºC (-4 ºF) unless they are approved for use at lower temperatures. However, at low ambient temperatures, flammable concentrations of vapors may not exist in a location classified Class I, Zone 0, 1, or 2 at normal ambient temperature.

1910.307(g)(5)

Listing and marking.

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1910.307(g)(5)(i)

Equipment that is listed for a Zone 0 location may be installed in a Zone 1 or Zone 2 location of the same gas or vapor. Equipment that is listed for a Zone 1 location may be installed in a Zone 2 location of the same gas or vapor.

1910.307(g)(5)(ii)

Equipment shall be marked in accordance with paragraph (g)(5)(ii)(A) and (g)(5)(ii)(B) of this section, except as provided in (g)(5)(ii)(C).

1910.307(g)(5)(ii)(A)

Equipment approved for Class I, Division 1 or Class 1, Division 2 shall, in addition to being marked in accordance with (c)(2)(ii), be marked with the following:

1910.307(g)(5)(ii)(A)(1)

Class I, Zone 1 or Class I, Zone 2 (as applicable);

1910.307(g)(5)(ii)(A)(2)

Applicable gas classification groups; and

1910.307(g)(5)(ii)(A)(3)

Temperature classification; or

1910.307(g)(5)(ii)(B)

Equipment meeting one or more of the protection techniques described in paragraph (g)(3) of this section shall be marked with the following in the order shown:

1910.307(g)(5)(ii)(B)(1)

Class, except for intrinsically safe apparatus;

1910.307(g)(5)(ii)(B)(2)

Zone, except for intrinsically safe apparatus;

1910.307(g)(5)(ii)(B)(3)

Symbol "AEx;"

1910.307(g)(5)(ii)(B)(4)

Protection techniques;

1910.307(g)(5)(ii)(B)(5)

Applicable gas classification groups; and

1910.307(g)(5)(ii)(B)(6)

Temperature classification, except for intrinsically safe apparatus.

Note to paragraph (g)(5)(ii)(B) of this section: An example of such a required marking is "Class I, Zone 0, AEx ia IIC T6." See Figure S-1 for an explanation of this marking.

1910.307(g)(5)(ii)(C)

Equipment that the employer demonstrates will provide protection from the hazards arising from the flammability of the gas or vapor and the zone of location involved and will be recognized as providing such protection by employees need not be marked.

Note to paragraph (g)(5)(ii)(C) of this section: The National Electrical Code, NFPA 70, contains guidelines for determining the type and design of equipment and installations that will meet this provision.

1910.307 - Hazardous (classified) locations. (1)

Class I, Zone 0 = Area Classification, AEx = Symbol for equipment built to American specifications, ia = Type of protection designations, IIC = Gas classification group (as required), T6 = Temperature Classification

[46 FR 4056, Jan. 16, 1981; 46 FR 40185, Aug. 7, 1981; 72 FR 7210, Feb. 14, 2007]

FAQs

What is classified hazardous location? ›

Hazardous (Classified) Locations. The National Electrical Code (NEC) defines hazardous locations as those areas "where fire or explosion hazards may exist due to flammable gases or vapors, flammable liquids, combustible dust, or ignitable fibers or flyings."

What are the 3 classes of hazardous locations? ›

The National Electric Code classifies hazardous locations in three ways: TYPE, CONDITION, and NATURE. There are three types of hazardous conditions: Class I - gas and vapor, Class II dust, and Class III - fibers and flyings.

How do you identify hazardous locations? ›

A Hazardous Area is defined by three main criteria, these being: The type of hazard (groups) The auto-ignition temperature of the hazardous material (temperature or “T” rating) The likelihood of the hazard being present in flammable concentrations (zones)

What is a Class 1 Division 1 hazardous location? ›

Class Definition

Class I locations are those in which flammable vapors and gases may be present. Class II locations are those in which combustible dust may be found. Class III locations are those which are hazardous because of the presence of easily ignitable fibers or flyings.

What are the 4 hazard classifications? ›

Physical Hazards
Hazard ClassAssociated Hazard Category
Gases under pressure4 Groups include: Compressed gas, Liquefied gas, Dissolved gas, and Refrigerated liquefied gas
Flammable liquidsCategories 1 - 4
Flammable solidsCategories 1 and 2
Self-reactive substancesTypes A-G
12 more rows

What is difference between Zone 1 and Zone 2? ›

Zone 1: An area in which an explosive gas atmosphere is likely to occur in normal operation; Zone 2: An area in which an explosive gas atmosphere is not likely to occur in normal operation and, if it occurs, will only exist for a short time.

What is the difference between Class 1 Division 1 and Division 2? ›

Class 1 Hazardous Locations refer to facilities that deal with flammable gases, vapors, and liquids. Division 2 specifies that flammable materials are handled, processed, or used at a location. But, concentrations of hazardous substances are not high enough to be ignitable.

What is a Class 3 hazard classification? ›

Class 3 dangerous goods are flammable liquids with flash points no more than 60 celcius degrees. It covers liquid substances, molten solid substances with a flash point above 60 celcius degrees and liquid desensitized explosives.

What is a Class 3 hazard? ›

Hazard Class 3: Flammable and Combustible Liquids.

What are the 5 areas hazards can be classified into? ›

The aim of this guide is to help you understand the different categories of hazards, so you can confidently identify them in your workplace.
  • Biological Hazards.
  • Chemical Hazards.
  • Physical Hazards.
  • Safety Hazards.
  • Ergonomic Hazards.
  • Psychosocial Hazards.
7 Jan 2019

What are 5 ways you can identify hazards? ›

Sources of information include:
  • Safety Data Sheets (SDSs).
  • Manufacturer's operating instructions, manuals, etc.
  • Test or monitor for exposure (occupational hygiene testing such as chemical or noise exposure).
  • Results of any job safety analysis.
  • Experiences of other organizations similar to yours.
4 May 2018

What are the 3 techniques used for hazard identification? ›

Top 3 Ways to Identify Hazards in the Workplace
  • Conduct regular worksite inspections. Walk through the worksite and visually assess the types of equipment, work practices, and any potential hazards that could be harmful to workers.
  • Interview workers and managers. ...
  • Create a hazard map.
21 May 2019

What is a Class 2 Division 1 hazardous location? ›

Division 1 is a subset of Class II and is classified as an area where the explosive or flammable combustible dusts mentioned above can exist under normal, everyday operating conditions.

What is a Class 2 Division 2? ›

Class 2 Division 2, also commonly written with a Roman numeral “Class ii Division 2”, represents an area where combustible dust may be present in quantities sufficient to ignite or explode.

What is a Class 1 Division 2 location OSHA? ›

Note to the definition of "Class I, Division 2:" This classification usually includes locations where volatile flammable liquids or flammable gases or vapors are used, but which would become hazardous only in case of an accident or of some unusual operating condition.

What is a Class 1 hazard classification? ›

Class 1 - Explosives

Division 1.1 Explosives which have a mass explosion hazard. Division 1.2 Explosives which have a projection hazard but not a mass explosion hazard. Division 1.3 Explosives which have a fire hazard and either a minor blast hazard or a minor projection hazard or both, but not a mass explosion hazard.

What are the 6 Classification of hazard? ›

Workplace hazards fall into six core types – safety, biological, physical, ergonomic, chemical and workload.

What are Category 1 and 2 hazards? ›

Hazards are divided into two categories. Those which score high on the scale (and therefore the greatest risk) are called Category 1 hazards. Those that fall lower down the scale and pose a lesser risk are called Category 2 hazards.

How do I determine Zone 2? ›

The formula is 220 minus your age. So if you're 30 years old, your maximum heart rate would be 190 (220 – 30 = 190). 70-80% of 190 would give you a Zone 2 heart rate range of 133-152, and you would want to stay as close to that 152 number as possible, without going over.

Is Zone 3 better than Zone 2? ›

Stick to Your Running Heart Rate Zones

An easy hour in Zone 2 will always provide a better benefit than a moderately hard Zone 3 effort for that same hour. You want to create a schedule that allows you to run easy days in Zone 2 to illicit a recovery response, increase aerobic capacity, and increase fatty acid usage.

What is allowed in Zone 2? ›

Zone 2 Requires electrical products to be IPX4 or better, or SELV with the transformer located beyond zone 2. Beyond zone 2 When the size of bathroom extends beyond zone 2, portable equipment is allowed, however they should be positioned such that that their flex length does not enable them to be used in zone 2.

Does Class 2 Div 2 require explosion proof? ›

To meet the requirements for Division 2, a light does not have to be able to contain an explosion. Instead, they must be found to be unable to cause an explosion in environments for which they are approved to be used.

Is Division 1 or Division 3 better? ›

Division I offers the highest level of competition and Division I schools' athletic departments have the biggest budgets. Division III is the lowest level of competition in the NCAA, and Division III schools also tend to have the smallest athletic department budgets.

Whats better Division 1 or 3? ›

With the way the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) categorizes its levels of college athletics into three divisions of competition, it's easy to simply believe that Division I athletics is the “best” and Division III is the “worst.” If the discussion revolves around airtime and media attention, that's ...

What does hazard class 2 indicate? ›

Hazard Class 2 – Gases

Flammable gases (2.1) burn readily in air and are in a gaseous state at 68°F (e.g., propane and spray paints). Non-flammable gases (2.2) may include liquified gases or cryogenic liquids (e.g., helium and asthma inhalers).

What is a Level 4 hazard? ›

Risk level 4: Very flammable gases or very volatile flammable liquids. Shut off flow and keep cooling water streams on exposed tanks or containers. Risk level 3: Materials that can be ignited under almost all normal temperature conditions. Water may be ineffective because of the low flash point.

Is hazard category 1 the most severe? ›

GHS hazard category is the division of criteria within each hazard class. For example, hazard class flammable liquids can be divided into 4 categories among which flammable liquids category 1 represents the most severe hazard.

What are the top 6 hazards in a workplace? ›

Here are the six most common types of hazards in the workplace:
  1. Safety Hazards. Safety hazards can affect any worker, but these are more likely to affect those who work with heavy machinery or on a construction site. ...
  2. Biological Hazards. ...
  3. Physical Hazards. ...
  4. Ergonomic Hazards. ...
  5. Chemical Hazards. ...
  6. Workload Hazards.

How are hazards identified in a workplace? ›

Workplace incidents –including injuries, illnesses, close calls/near misses, and reports of other concerns– provide a clear indication of where hazards exist. By thoroughly investigating incidents and reports, you will identify hazards that are likely to cause future harm.

How do you identify hazards in the workplace environment? ›

Incident records and investigations, near misses, health monitoring and inspection results will all help identify types of hazards in the workplace. If something cause injury to someone, then a hazard exists, which could also hurt someone else.

What are the 4 ways to control hazards? ›

This process is often called risk assessment.
...
Sometimes using more than one control measure could be the most effective way to reduce the exposure to hazards.
  • 1 Eliminate the hazard. ...
  • 2 Substitute the hazard. ...
  • 3 Isolate the hazard. ...
  • 4 Use engineering controls.
9 Jun 2022

What are the 4 risk elements used to identify hazards? ›

There are four parts to any good risk assessment and they are Asset identification, Risk Analysis, Risk likelihood & impact, and Cost of Solutions.

What is the most common method for categorizing the hazard? ›

A common way to classify hazards is by category:
  • biological - bacteria, viruses, insects, plants, birds, animals, and humans, etc.,
  • chemical - depends on the physical, chemical and toxic properties of the chemical,
  • ergonomic - repetitive movements, improper set up of workstation, etc.,

What is a Class 1 Division 1? ›

Class I, Division 1 classified locations. An area where ignitable concentrations of flammable gases, vapors or liquids can exist all of the time or some of the time under normal operating conditions. A Class I, Division 1 area encompasses the combination of Zone 0 and Zone 1 areas.

What is a Class 2 Division 2 location? ›

A Class II, Division 2 location is a location where combustible dust is not normally in the air in quantities sufficient to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures, and dust accumulations are insufficient to interfere with the normal operation of electrical equipment or other apparatus.

Does Class 1 Div 2 require seal offs? ›

Seals are required for each run of conduit entering or leaving a Class I, Zone 2 location. Seals may be either inside or outside of the hazardous area but they must be at the first joint in the conduit. This box may be standard non-explosion proof type.

What is a Class 2 rating? ›

Class 2 cables shall have a voltage rating of not less than 150 volts. Class 3 cables shall have a voltage rating of not less than 300 volts. Class 2 and Class 3 cables shall have a temperature rating of not less than 60°C (140°F).

Can I use a piece of equipment approved for use in a Division 2 hazardous location in a Division 1 hazardous location? ›

Q: Can I use a piece of equipment approved for use in a Division 1 hazardous location in a Division 2 hazardous location? A: Yes. If equipment has been approved for use in a Division 1 hazardous location, it can be used in a Division 2 hazardous location, providing it is in the same class and group.

What is the classified assignment in Division 2? ›

Classified Assignments are an activity introduced into Tom Clancy's The Division 2 in Update 1.0. 6. They are miniature missions that contain additional audio logs and clues as to how Washington, D.C. fell before the events of The Division 2.

Which enclosure is suitable for use in Class 1 hazardous locations? ›

We recommend electrical enclosures meet or exceed a NEMA rating of Type 4 or Type 4X for use in a Class1 Div2 hazardous location when used with appropriate purge systems.

What type of hazard class division is 1.1 1? ›

division 1.1 consists of explosives that have a mass explosion hazard. A mass explosion is one that affects nearly the entire load instantaneously. division 1.3g (if the major hazard is radiant heat or violent burning, or both, but there is no blast or projection hazard) fireworks un0335 (display).

What is a Class 2 Division 2.2 hazardous material? ›

Class 2 dangerous goods are gases.

It covers compressed gases, liquefied gases, dissolved gases, refrigerated liquefied gases, mixtures of gases and aerosol dispensers/articles containing gas. There are 3 sub-divisions: Division 2.1: Flammable gases. Division 2.2: Non-flammable, non-toxic gases.

What are classified locations? ›

Areas are generally hazardous (classified) locations if ignitable concentrations of flammable gases, flammable liquid-produced vapors, combustible liquid-produced vapors, combustible dust, or ignitable fibers/flyings — either in suspension in the air or other accumulations that present explosion or fire hazards — exist ...

What is an example of a hazardous area? ›

EXAMPLES OF HAZARDOUS AREAS

Gas wells, gas processing plants and gas-fired generators are common areas that contain hazardous areas due to the natural gas that is released in different sections of the plant in concentrations that can be considered as a flammable mixture.

What is the purpose of hazardous area classification? ›

Hazardous area classification is: a method of analysing and classifying an area to facilitate appropriate equipment selection. key to reducing the risk of fires or explosions and keeping dangerous work environments safe. critical in protecting people, plant and equipment.

What is the difference between Class 1 Division 1 and Division 2? ›

Class 1 Hazardous Locations refer to facilities that deal with flammable gases, vapors, and liquids. Division 2 specifies that flammable materials are handled, processed, or used at a location. But, concentrations of hazardous substances are not high enough to be ignitable.

What is a Class 1 Division 2 hazardous area? ›

Class I Hazardous Locations refer to facilities which deal with flammable gases, vapors, and liquids. Division 2 specifies that these flammable materials are handled, processed, or used in the defined hazardous location, but are not normally present in concentrations high enough to be ignitable.

What is a Class 1 Division 1 area? ›

A Class I, Division 1 area encompasses the combination of Zone 0 and Zone 1 areas. An area where ignitable concentrations of flammable gases, vapors or liquids are present continuously or for long periods of time under normal operating conditions.

What are the 10 examples of hazardous? ›

Hazardous chemicals, which include the following: acids, caustic substances, disinfectants, glues, heavy metals (mercury, lead, aluminium), paint, pesticides, petroleum products, and solvents.

What is a Class 3 hazard classification? ›

Class 3 dangerous goods are flammable liquids with flash points no more than 60 celcius degrees. It covers liquid substances, molten solid substances with a flash point above 60 celcius degrees and liquid desensitized explosives.

What are the 9 hazardous classes? ›

The nine hazard classes are as follows:
  • Class 1: Explosives.
  • Class 2: Gases.
  • Class 3: Flammable and Combustible Liquids.
  • Class 4: Flammable Solids.
  • Class 5: Oxidizing Substances, Organic Peroxides.
  • Class 6: Toxic Substances and Infectious Substances.
  • Class 7: Radioactive Materials.
  • Class 8: Corrosives.

How do you conduct a hazardous area classification? ›

Hazardous locations are categorized by class, group, and division as follows. Class I: Denotes areas where flammable gas, vapor, or liquid is present. Class II: Denotes areas where combustible dust is present. Class III: Denotes areas where ignitable fibers are present.

1. MSCI Safety Webinar: OSHA Compliance for the Metals Industry
(Metals Service Center Institute)

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Address: 743 Stoltenberg Center, Genovevaville, NJ 59925-3119

Phone: +2202978377583

Job: Administration Engineer

Hobby: Surfing, Sailing, Listening to music, Web surfing, Kitesurfing, Geocaching, Backpacking

Introduction: My name is Rubie Ullrich, I am a enthusiastic, perfect, tender, vivacious, talented, famous, delightful person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.